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Piracy &

Protection

16 April 2010

Last revised

minutes

4

Reading time

Piracy raises a matrix of legal issues, just at the time when the consideration of these will be the last thing on anyone’s mind. This reinforces the desirability of taking advice in advance and, if necessary, placing a trained and equipped security team on board. For those with real concerns about security, compared with highways, houses and offices, yachts will always be – by far – the most secure location.

minutes

4

Reading time

16 April 2010

Last revised

Piracy raises a matrix of legal issues, just at the time when the consideration of these will be the last thing on anyone’s mind. This reinforces the desirability of taking advice in advance and, if necessary, placing a trained and equipped security team on board. For those with real concerns about security, compared with highways, houses and offices, yachts will always be – by far – the most secure location.

  • Piracy is defined as any illegal act of violence, detention, or destruction committed by the crew or passengers of a private vessel against another vessel or persons/property on board, outside any country's territorial waters.

  • Hotspots for piracy include the coasts of Indonesia, Somalia, Bangladesh, Nigeria and some South American countries.

  • Insurance coverage for yachts usually has restrictions on cruising areas, and breaching these restrictions may void coverage.

  • Insurers have a broader definition of piracy than the legal definition, as attacks are more likely to occur within territorial waters.

  • Obtaining up-to-date information on current piracy hotspots is crucial, and insurers and maritime security firms can provide assistance.

  • Maintaining vigilance and employing defence measures such as acoustic defence systems and strong-rooms are recommended for yachts in high-risk areas.

  • The legality of carrying weapons depends on the laws of the flag state (where the yacht is registered) and the port state (where the yacht is located).

  • Some countries allow firearms on board as part of the yacht's equipment, while others prohibit certain weapons entirely.

  • Legal consequences and the use of firearms in self-defence can vary depending on the laws of the flag state, port state, and international criminal law.

  • Recognizing pirates can be challenging, and preemptive action may have legal implications. Self-defence and defence of others must be reasonable and proportional to the perceived threat.

  • Maintaining vigilance and employing defence measures such as acoustic defence systems and strong-rooms are recommended for yachts in high-risk areas.

  • The legality of carrying weapons depends on the laws of the flag state (where the yacht is registered) and the port state (where the yacht is located).

  • Some countries allow firearms on board as part of the yacht's equipment, while others prohibit certain weapons entirely.

  • Legal consequences and the use of firearms in self-defence can vary depending on the laws of the flag state, port state, and international criminal law.

  • Recognizing pirates can be challenging, and preemptive action may have legal implications. Self-defence and defence of others must be reasonable and proportional to the perceived threat.